Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
 
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity Mediation, Diversity Mediation, Diversity Mediation, Diversity Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
 
Mediation, Diversity
Mediation, Diversity
Impasse●ology™ Inner Circle Archive Post #1

Mediation, Diversity Mediation, Diversity
 
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What’s Your Dispute Resolution Mantra?

Problem: During contentious settlement negotiations, there’s a tendency to lose sight of the ultimate goal. So both sides end up attacking each other instead of attacking the primary issues and their potential solutions. In other words, everybody has chosen to play an “If We’re Gonna Win-You Gotta Lose” game where nobody wins.

Solution: First, you should take a moment and step outside the fight to see the winner-take-all game that’s really being played.  Next, you want to repeat the following mantra as many times at it takes until you reclaim your good senses: “Don’t Hate The Players. Hate The Game.” Then figure out how to change to game to a collaborative “Win-Win.”

What’s A Mantra? A mantra is a guiding principle that inspires us to our best performance. “Don’t Hate The Players. Hate The Game” is my personal mantra. It’s a simple, powerful reminder for me to focus playing the right game, despite the distracting misbehaviors of the players.

What’s Your Personal Mantra? If you don’t have one, the do yourself a favor and get one . . .right away.

Impasse●ology™ Inner Circle Archive Post #2

Mediation, Diversity Mediation, Diversity
 
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Diversity Imbalance: Dispute Resolution’s Hidden Nemesis

Definition:
A Diversity Imbalance is when the diversity makeup of the participants in a mediation or settlement negotiation is unequal or lopsided. (By participants, I mean the attorneys, human resource professionals or the union reps, as well as the disputing parties themselves.)  The imbalance may be race-based or gender, nationality, age, job title, social class, income, etc. And it may not even be real, just a figment of someone's imagination.

The Problem:
When facing an imbalance, real or imagined, the party at risk feels outnumbered, vulnerable, and powerless. That’s when he’s likely to enter an Altered State. (And others may follow.) Negative emotions take over. Trust disappears, even toward his own representatives. Self-protective and illogical behavior rule the day.

The Solution:
You as a conflict manager should do the following:

  1. Evaluate the potential for diversity imbalances and proactively move to counter it before going to the negotiation table.
  1. Consider your own diversity differences in relation to your client.
  1. Help the other side with their diversity imbalance issues.
  1. Retain mediators and other neutrals that can help balance the scale. Consider using the co-mediation model where the two mediators mirror the respective disputants.
Mediation, Diversity
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